White Cube

Tagsmart was here: Adrián Villar Rojas, Soul of a Nation and Dreamers Awake

From the Series ‘The Theatre of Disappearance’
Adrián Villar Rojas

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Adrián Villar Rojas calls into question the supremacy of any particular artwork. For his first exhibition in London since 2013, the Argentinian artist presents a life-size marble reproduction of the legs of Michelangelo’s David. The simplicity and beauty of the replicated 15th-century sculpture contrast with two adorable kittens smooching by his feet.

This piece is concurrent with exhibitions on the rooftop of The Met in New York, the Kunsthaus Bregenz in Bregenz, Austria and the NEON Foundation in Athens, Greece. 

Marian Goodman Gallery, until July 21
5-8 Lower John Street, W1F 9DY


Soul of a Nation: Art in the Age of Black Power

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“The biggest achievement of this exhibition is the recovering of the talented legion of artists who have been kept out of the American canon of genius in a way that is utterly unjust,” says Jonathan Jones of The Guardian. Art from the 1950s is predominantly represented nowadays by American icons such as Robert Rauschenberg, Jasper Johns and Andy Warhol. 

Above is a painting April 4, which marks the first anniversary of the murder of Martin Luther King with a cascade of purple tears. This piece is by Sam Gilliam whose artistic genius was forgotten until only recently, now in his 80’s. But Gilliam’s art is not the only artwork to come out the woodwork, there are copies of The Black Panther magazine to self-portraits of Barkley Hendricks entitled Brilliantly Endowed and Frank Bowling’s unforgettable paintings. 

Tate Modern, until October 22
Bankside, SE1 9TG


Dreamers Awake
Eileen Agar, Leonora Carrington, Lee Miller, Dorothea Tanning, Leonor Fini, Francesca Woodman, Hannah Wilke, Louise Bourgeois, Rosemarie Trockel,  Kiki Smith, Paloma Varga Weisz, Mona Hatoum, Tracey Emin and Sarah Lucas, amongst others

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This exhibition of more than 50 contemporary and emerging artists, as well as well-known Surrealist figures, artfully riffs around what it means to live inside rather than gaze upon a female form.

The show explores surrealism through the eyes of women, such as Mona Hatoum who subverts the objectification of the female form with Jardin Public (1993) or Claude Cahun who plays with gender identity as a fluid construct in her iconic black and white self-portraits from the 1930s.

White Cube Bermondsey, Until September 17
144-152 Bermondsey Street, SE1 3TQ

Tagsmart was here: Harland Miller, Alison Mc Kenna and (many) others

O Canada! 
Fiona Ackerman, Andy Dixon, Kim Dorland, Scott Everingham, Thrush Holmes, Erin Loree, Erik Olson, Justin Ogilvie, Andrew Salgado, Andrea Willamson and Etienne Zack 

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The gallery, which began with pop-up exhibitions in Vancouver in 2008, maintains an exhibition programme with a partially Canadian focus. Led by Director Kurt Beers, who is himself Canadian, the exhibition celebrates the 150th birthday of Canada and provides the first opportunity for the gallery to host an exhibition with exclusively Canadian artists.

Intentionally circumventing any overriding theme, O Canada! finds commonalities between the 11 artists based solely on their heritage, raising questions as to whether there truly is some sort of collective, cultural consciousness or aesthetic tradition.

BEERS London, until August 19
1 Baldwin Street, EC1V 9NU


A Harmony of Opposites
Alison Mc Kenna

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John Marchant Gallery presents British artist Alison Mc Kenna’s first solo exhibition, A Harmony of Opposites. McKenna creates a sense of space and energy, ‘trying to find a simplicity and a charge’. By introducing the idea to accept and use imbalance, her works render the viewer slightly unsteady, searching for symmetry and order.

A number of the works on display were created in Andalusia and the white light of the south is evident throughout the show. A sense that is heightened by the hazy impressions created by the bursts of black charcoal and sporadic dabs of blazing colour.

John Marchant Gallery, until July 29
159 Farringdon Road, EC1R 3AL


One Bar Electric Memoir
Harland Miller

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Harland Miller is both a writer and an artist, practising both roles over a peripatetic career in both Europe and America.

In 2001 Miller produced a series of paintings based of the dust jackets of Penguin books. By combining the motif inherent in the Penguin book, Miller found a way to marry aspects of Pop Art, abstraction and figurative painting at once, with his writer’s love of text. The ensuing images are humorous, sardonic and nostalgic at the same time, while the painting style hints at the dog-eared, scuffed covers of the Penguin classics themselves. Miller continues to create work in this vein, expanding the book covers to include his own phrases, some hilarious and absurd, others with a lush melancholy.

White Cube Mason’s Yard, until September 9
25-26 Mason’s Yard, St. James’s, SW1Y 6BU