USA

Peter Doig wins case involving painting's attribution

Peter Doig did not create a 40-year-old landscape painting, despite the claims of the former corrections officer who owns it, a federal judge ruled on Tuesday. As a result, he was not responsible for destroying the plaintiffs’ plan to sell the work for millions of dollars.

The ruling, after seven days of heated and sometimes bizarre testimony in federal court this month in Chicago, would appear to end one of the stranger art authentication cases in recent history. It had pitted Mr. Doig, a well-known artist whose works routinely sell for US$10 million, against the owner of the painting and that man’s art dealer. They had accused Mr. Doig of falsely denying that he had created the work as a young man in Canada, thus scuttling their efforts to sell it.

“Peter Doig could not have been the author of this work,” Judge Gary Feinerman said.

'Imagine how easy Keith Haring is to fake'

Last October Richard Polsky, the San Francisco art dealer who wrote I Bought Andy Warhol, started an authentication service for the artist’s works, driven by the dissolution of the Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts’ authentication committee four years earlier. Now, Polsky has announced that he is taking on authentication of works by Keith Haring and Jean-Michel Basquiat.

Antiques Roadshow accidentally appraised a high school art project at US$50,000

Sometimes even Antiques Roadshow makes a mistake: An face jug that the show appraised at US$50,000 last year, calling it “bizarre and wonderful” and assigning it to the late 19th or early 20th century, was actually made in an Oregon high school art class in the ‘70s. The artist, a Bend, Oregon horse trainer named Betsy Soule, came forward after a friend recognised her piece on the show. It has since been re-appraised for between US$3,000 and US$5,000.

Celebrity L.A. art dealer is held on US$1 million bail

Four years ago, the glitterati descended on the grand opening of Perry Rubenstein’s new art gallery in Hollywood.

Musician Neil Young, movie producer Steven Tisch and artist Shepard Fairey were among the guests who packed into the modernist space marked by its bold charcoal exterior and expansive white interior. The event spoke to Rubenstein’s status as a formidable dealer in the celebrity art world.

But since then, a series of legal disputes has led to a dramatic fall for the veteran art gallerist.

FBI seizes art and documents from Santa Fe dealers

FBI agents carried paintings, documents and a computer last week from the homes of two Santa Fe art dealers under investigation for possible fraud, court documents show, as artists claim they have not been paid for work the duo has sold and buyers allege they have not received pieces they purchased.

Search warrants unsealed in federal court Friday indicate investigators are trying to track down paintings claimed by several artists and buyers who say they have struggled for years to recover works that rotated through galleries jointly owned by Saher Saman and Marji Hoyle.