Royal Academy of Arts

YOUR SHARE IN OUR SUCCESS!

We’re launching a major new service later this year to enable artists, online retailers and collectors to trade trusted art. And next year, we’re expanding into the US and other overseas markets.

We have partnered with Seedrs to launch a crowdfunding campaign and we’d love for you to be a part of the next stage of our journey.

By pre-registering via the link below, you will also be one of the first to know when the campaign goes live.

http://www.tagsmart.com/crowdfunding-register

About Tagsmart

Tagsmart is a British technology company, formally launched in April 2016. The company pioneered the application of DNA tags to authenticate artworks and is now the go-to provider of tagging and certification services in the fine art market. It was the only such business highlighted in the 2017 Deloitte Art and Finance Report. Tagsmart already has 23,000 artworks on its platform attributed to over 200 artists and has tagged and certificated more than 11,000 works.

Led by Executive Chairman/Founder Investor Tom Toumazis MBE, Tagsmart was set up by globally renowned frame-maker and fabricator Mark Darbyshire and product designer Steve Cooke in 2014. The team features experts from art and tech backgrounds including Nicolas Gitton, former UK MD of Paddle8,  Robert Suss, renowned art collector and Trustee of the Royal Academy of Arts, Aino-Leena Grapin. Philip Mould CBE, of BBC’s Fake or Fortune, is also an advisor to the company.

The company has relationships with hundreds of artists, galleries, and fabricators, from world-renowned founding partners like Gary Hume through to increasing numbers of emerging and decorative artists.

Tagsmart.com

Tagsmart's Non-Executive Director Robert Suss #3 on Christie’s 'Top 100 art collectors Instagram accounts' list

Robert Suss is also a Trustee of the Royal Academy of Arts and Co-Founder of the Frank-Suss Collection, which contains more than 1,000 works by emerging and mid-career artists from ‘countries undergoing significant social, economic, or political change’. 

His account is a mixture of socialising, additions to his collection, and holiday shots.

Follow him! https://www.instagram.com/robertsuss/

Tagsmart hand-pick: best 2017 exhibitions... so far!

What was the best exhibition you’ve been to over the past few months? Here are the Tagsmart team’s highlights of 2017 so far, plus what we’re looking forward to next!

Julie Smith, Business Development Manager
Wolfgang Tillmans at Tate Modern

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His abstract photography pieces were just beautiful, particularly Blushes #136 (2014). It was the first time that I saw photography executed in this way. By playing with chemicals and light, he created almost a painting through photography. Another work that drew me in was Tillmans’ luscious and foamy depiction of the sea in La Palma (2014). Very satisfying to look at.

My next exhibition: Kevin Callaghan at Doswell Gallery

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Aya Aroukatos, PR & Marketing Executive
Donna Huanca’s Scar Cymbals at the Zabludowicz Collection

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This exhibition at Zabludowicz Collection was the most moving exhibition that I had ever been to, leaving a permanent impression on me. 

Upon entering, I was faced with mostly naked men and women, wearing only latex, ripped bodystockings and slathers of paint. They moved in slow motion to the sound of a heavy bass, leaving remnants of paint on the glass installation and footsteps in the sand maze.

I thought that a room filled with naked people would put me on edge, but somehow I felt I could sit in the beautiful chapel and watch the scene with comfort, totally mesmerised by the passing models who seemed totally unaware of my presence.

The show could have been laughable, but Huanca executed it with a certain delicacy and fearlessness which I cannot contest.

My next exhibition: Michael Wolf’s Tokyo Compression at Flowers Gallery

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Julia Ferreira de Abreu, Marketing Manager
Joel Shapiro at Pace Gallery

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Back in the 1950/60s, Hélio Oiticica created the radical series of red, yellow, and orange hanging structures called Relevos Espaciais (Spatial Reliefs). Built from sheets of plywood, they intersect and overlap, leaving gaps through which light can pass. By transposing blocks of colour into space, Oiticica involved the viewers in a personal and immersive way with these three-dimensional constructions.

It seems to me a further step was taken in this direction with Joel Shapiro’s suspended sculptures, which seem to float and defy gravity. Open to several possible interpretations, his continuous study of the dynamics of form and colour confounds expectations and challenges our senses.  

My next exhibition: Giacometti at Tate Modern and The Discovery of Mondrian at the Gemeentemuseum Den Haag 

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Steve Cooke, Chief Innovation Officer & Co-Founder
Picasso: Minotaurs and Matadors at Gagosian Grosvenor Hill 

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What fascinates me about him is his almost unique talent for creative composition, which is really clear in the works shown here. There was less emphasis on his paintings, which suited me because I don’t enjoy them as much! I bought several, of course – they took my cheque.

My next exhibition: The Other Art Fair at the Truman Brewery

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Pavel Baskakov, Product Development Manager
David Hockney at Tate Britain

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I loved the way it was set up. It was very interesting to see periods in his life divided by rooms and so much of his work in one place. The last room with digital iPad drawings just showed how talented he really is, that he could adapt quickly to new media.

My next exhibition: Summer Exhibition 2017 at the Royal Academy of Arts