Painter

Tagsmart weekly discovery: the art of Martin Yeoman

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Member of the New English Art Club and The Society of Portrait Sculptors, artist Martin Yeoman trained at the Royal Academy Schools from 1975 to 1979 and teaches today at The Royal Drawing School and the New School of Art

Prolific in portraiture, still life, landscape and sculpture, Yeoman is considered one of the finest draughtsmen today. Working across a broad range of mediums, the artist has developed a style that draws inspiration from Goya and Delacroix. 

As for the artist painting first and foremost should possess honesty, feeling and integrity, his work is rooted in personal impression, drawing and painting from life. 

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Among his most notable commissions to date is the portrait of singer-songwriter Ed Sheeran and of Her Majesty The Queen’s grandchildren, now housed in the Royal Collection at Windsor Castle. Yeoman has also accompanied HRH The Prince of Wales on official overseas tours to the Gulf States, Hong Kong, Nepal and India. His portrait of Sir James Whyte Black is in the National Portrait Gallery collection. 

The artist won the Ondaatje Prize for Portraiture in 2002 and the Doreen McIntosh Prize in 2016 and has been included in the Royal Academy Summer Exhibition on 19 occasions (1976–2006), the Lynn Painter-Stainers Prize 2017 and in the BP Portrait Award, 1981, 1983 and 2016.

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Selected for last year’s BP Portrait Award was Yeoman’s Laurie Weeden, D-Day Glider Pilot portrait, one of four studies the artist made following a special commission by HRH The Duke of Rothesay for the 2015 exhibition The Last of The Tide at the Buckingham Palace.

French firm to authenticate controversial Korean painting

Chun Kyung-ja was one of the most prominent female painters in Korea’s modern art history. She is best known for her portrayal of women and flowers, as shown in her controversial painting Beautiful Woman.

The controversy began in 1991 when Chun claimed that a painting attributed to her, which was (and has since been) on display at the Museum of Modern and Contemporary Art (MMCA), was a fake. An authentication process soon followed, but eventually the museum and the Galleries Association of Korea (GAK) announced that the work was legitimate.

Unconvinced and full of despair, Chun donated 93 of her works and left Korea for the United States in 1998, never to return. During the entire period of her exile to the U.S. up until her death in 2015, Chun never painted again.

But the authenticity dispute resurfaced with media coverage of Chun’s later years and the controversial painting, with Chun’s remaining family members and their team of lawyers filing a lawsuit in April against MMCA officials claiming that the museum had declared a counterfeit painting as a genuine one.

The lawyers have since demanded that an outside institution with no relationship to the MMCA or the GAK carry out an authentication process for impartiality, which is when the French art technology firm Lumiere Technology stepped in.

The authentication team from the French company arrived in Korea Tuesday, according to the Prosecutors’ Office, and has since been carrying out its authentication procedure using the company’s self-pioneered technique called Layer Amplification Method; the same method the company used to analyze the Mona Lisa and discover a hidden portrait under the iconic Da Vinci painting.

The method will analyse the controversial painting for its various elements, such as brush stroke, paints, and the order of workflow, and compare it to other works by Chun for a comparative analysis. According to the prosecutors, the process is expected to wrap up by the end of the month.

Prosecutors will be piecing together all the corroborative evidence, including the final verdict from Lumiere Technology, to determine the authenticity of Beautiful Woman, and officials are hopeful that the decades-long dispute will finally be settled.

Peter Doig says he didn't paint this. Now he has to prove it.

The owner, a former corrections officer who said he knew Doig while working in a Canadian detention facility, said the famous painter indeed created the work as a youthful inmate there. His suit contends that Doig is either confused or lying and that his denials blew up a plan to sell the work for millions of dollars.

Master forger Geert Jan Jansen presents own exhibition

The Dutch painter Geert Jan Jansen has just opened his new exhibition in List, Germany. Although this time the works on display are modelled after original masterpieces, they are not regarded as a forgery as they are signed by the artist with his own name. Some of the 135 exhibits are also his own work.

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The 72-year-old is well-known in the art world for his copying skills and is considered the “master forger of the century”. Jansen has forged works of over 40 different artists, including Pablo Picasso, Juan Miró, Paul Gauguin and Marc Chagall. He not only has copied artworks of these artists, but also used their individual artistic language to create original pieces and sign it their names. 

Jansen was arrested in 1994 in France, when over 1,500 artworks were seized. He was held in detention for six months, but was acquitted for lack of evidence. 

The exhibition runs until July 3rd.