Pace Gallery

Tagsmart hand-pick: best 2017 exhibitions... so far!

What was the best exhibition you’ve been to over the past few months? Here are the Tagsmart team’s highlights of 2017 so far, plus what we’re looking forward to next!

Julie Smith, Business Development Manager
Wolfgang Tillmans at Tate Modern

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His abstract photography pieces were just beautiful, particularly Blushes #136 (2014). It was the first time that I saw photography executed in this way. By playing with chemicals and light, he created almost a painting through photography. Another work that drew me in was Tillmans’ luscious and foamy depiction of the sea in La Palma (2014). Very satisfying to look at.

My next exhibition: Kevin Callaghan at Doswell Gallery

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Aya Aroukatos, PR & Marketing Executive
Donna Huanca’s Scar Cymbals at the Zabludowicz Collection

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This exhibition at Zabludowicz Collection was the most moving exhibition that I had ever been to, leaving a permanent impression on me. 

Upon entering, I was faced with mostly naked men and women, wearing only latex, ripped bodystockings and slathers of paint. They moved in slow motion to the sound of a heavy bass, leaving remnants of paint on the glass installation and footsteps in the sand maze.

I thought that a room filled with naked people would put me on edge, but somehow I felt I could sit in the beautiful chapel and watch the scene with comfort, totally mesmerised by the passing models who seemed totally unaware of my presence.

The show could have been laughable, but Huanca executed it with a certain delicacy and fearlessness which I cannot contest.

My next exhibition: Michael Wolf’s Tokyo Compression at Flowers Gallery

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Julia Ferreira de Abreu, Marketing Manager
Joel Shapiro at Pace Gallery

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Back in the 1950/60s, Hélio Oiticica created the radical series of red, yellow, and orange hanging structures called Relevos Espaciais (Spatial Reliefs). Built from sheets of plywood, they intersect and overlap, leaving gaps through which light can pass. By transposing blocks of colour into space, Oiticica involved the viewers in a personal and immersive way with these three-dimensional constructions.

It seems to me a further step was taken in this direction with Joel Shapiro’s suspended sculptures, which seem to float and defy gravity. Open to several possible interpretations, his continuous study of the dynamics of form and colour confounds expectations and challenges our senses.  

My next exhibition: Giacometti at Tate Modern and The Discovery of Mondrian at the Gemeentemuseum Den Haag 

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Steve Cooke, Chief Innovation Officer & Co-Founder
Picasso: Minotaurs and Matadors at Gagosian Grosvenor Hill 

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What fascinates me about him is his almost unique talent for creative composition, which is really clear in the works shown here. There was less emphasis on his paintings, which suited me because I don’t enjoy them as much! I bought several, of course – they took my cheque.

My next exhibition: The Other Art Fair at the Truman Brewery

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Pavel Baskakov, Product Development Manager
David Hockney at Tate Britain

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I loved the way it was set up. It was very interesting to see periods in his life divided by rooms and so much of his work in one place. The last room with digital iPad drawings just showed how talented he really is, that he could adapt quickly to new media.

My next exhibition: Summer Exhibition 2017 at the Royal Academy of Arts

Artist Lee Ufan’s forgery scandal continues

Three people have been arrested for allegedly forging and selling copies of artist Lee Ufan’s paintings. A National Forensic Service investigation confirmed that the six works in question do not align with genuine pieces by Ufan. The artist, however, maintains that the 13 paintings in questions are his authentic works.

Following a tip-off last December, the police raided Seoul galleries suspected of selling fake artworks by Ufan. The following month the police said that the Certificate of Authenticity for his 1978 painting From Point No. 780217, which was sold for US$415,600 to a private collector at an auction last year, had been forged. Although the artwork itself was proven to be authentic, the incident raised further suspicions surrounding the authenticity of his paintings.

In May and July, the police arrested three art forgers for 55 fake pieces claimed to have been done by Ufan, and selling them through the same gallery implicated in the latest police discovery. With four of the 13 paintings seized by the police credited to this group and six paintings claimed to have been forged by the latest forgery ring, the source or sources of the remaining three seized paintings are still unknown.

Ufan has been steadfast in his claims that the paintings alleged to have been forged are in fact his works. “A person’s flow and rhythm are like one’s fingerprints, which cannot be imitated,” he said at a press conference in June, after examining 13 works the National Forensic Service seized and identified as fake. “They are undoubtedly mine.”