Landscape

Tagsmart weekly discovery: the art of Martin Yeoman

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Member of the New English Art Club and The Society of Portrait Sculptors, artist Martin Yeoman trained at the Royal Academy Schools from 1975 to 1979 and teaches today at The Royal Drawing School and the New School of Art

Prolific in portraiture, still life, landscape and sculpture, Yeoman is considered one of the finest draughtsmen today. Working across a broad range of mediums, the artist has developed a style that draws inspiration from Goya and Delacroix. 

As for the artist painting first and foremost should possess honesty, feeling and integrity, his work is rooted in personal impression, drawing and painting from life. 

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Among his most notable commissions to date is the portrait of singer-songwriter Ed Sheeran and of Her Majesty The Queen’s grandchildren, now housed in the Royal Collection at Windsor Castle. Yeoman has also accompanied HRH The Prince of Wales on official overseas tours to the Gulf States, Hong Kong, Nepal and India. His portrait of Sir James Whyte Black is in the National Portrait Gallery collection. 

The artist won the Ondaatje Prize for Portraiture in 2002 and the Doreen McIntosh Prize in 2016 and has been included in the Royal Academy Summer Exhibition on 19 occasions (1976–2006), the Lynn Painter-Stainers Prize 2017 and in the BP Portrait Award, 1981, 1983 and 2016.

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Selected for last year’s BP Portrait Award was Yeoman’s Laurie Weeden, D-Day Glider Pilot portrait, one of four studies the artist made following a special commission by HRH The Duke of Rothesay for the 2015 exhibition The Last of The Tide at the Buckingham Palace.

Mall Galleries: Parks – Our Shared Heritage

In celebration of National Parks Week, Tagsmart partner Mall Galleries has come together with The Royal Parks, the Office of Public Works and The Hearsum Collection to display the most outstanding British landscapes through art. 

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For the first time ever, London will be hosting an exhibition exploring Britain’s rich heritage history, with rarely seen artefacts including oil paintings, photographs, and historical documents spanning three centuries. A fascinating insight is offered into the parks’ connections with prominent historical figures including the Royal Family and Prime Ministers.

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In addition to the show, The Royal Parks – in partnership with the education team at Mall Galleries – will host a number of community art activities from 28 July to 11 August (find out more here).

Don’t miss this exploration of the rich and previously hidden heritage of unique parks, from their creation as Royal hunting grounds to the much loved public parks we see today. At the Mall Galleries until 11 August.

Peter Doig wins case involving painting's attribution

Peter Doig did not create a 40-year-old landscape painting, despite the claims of the former corrections officer who owns it, a federal judge ruled on Tuesday. As a result, he was not responsible for destroying the plaintiffs’ plan to sell the work for millions of dollars.

The ruling, after seven days of heated and sometimes bizarre testimony in federal court this month in Chicago, would appear to end one of the stranger art authentication cases in recent history. It had pitted Mr. Doig, a well-known artist whose works routinely sell for US$10 million, against the owner of the painting and that man’s art dealer. They had accused Mr. Doig of falsely denying that he had created the work as a young man in Canada, thus scuttling their efforts to sell it.

“Peter Doig could not have been the author of this work,” Judge Gary Feinerman said.

Brett Whiteley fraudster ‘helped uncover another fake’

The conservator who created fake Brett Whiteley paintings that sold for millions of dollars was also an art sleuth who helped his clients uncover fraudulent works. Mohamed Aman Siddique helped prove a work was wrongly sold by an auction house as a ­Eugene Von Guerard painting.

In a character reference to the Victorian Supreme Court, which will sentence Siddique for fraud ­offences this week, Mr Bleasel, a former head of the Australian Antarctic Division, told how Siddique helped him chase a refund from the auction house.

Despite his doubts about the painting, Mr Bleasel had bought it after the auction house and two art dealers confirmed it as an authentic work by Von Guerard, a colonial landscape artist.

The painting needed cleaning and repair so Mr Bleasel sent it to Siddique. “He said that as he had strong doubts about the authenticity of that painting, he had started cleaning around the signature. That cleaning revealed that the signature had originally read ‘after Eugene Von Guerard’ but the ‘after’ had been painted over to make the painting more valuable.”

Mr Bleasel received a refund, but said the incident helped form his view of questionable practices in the Australian art industry.

Spanish police make arrests over stolen Francis Bacon works

Seven people have been arrested in Spain on suspicion of involvement in the theft of five paintings by Francis Bacon, worth a total of £19m.

The paintings were stolen last July, along with other valuables belonging to the owner, who is reported to have been a close friend of Bacon. The works, which comprise portraits and landscapes, are yet to be recovered.

Detectives said they were approached in February by British private investigators specialising in the recovery of stolen artworks who had received an email with photographs of the paintings and asking whether they were listed as stolen. Investigators analysed the photo and were able to determine that the camera that took the images was owned by a photographic equipment rental company, which supplied details of the customer who had rented it at the time the paintings were photographed.

The customer, who is suspected of involvement in the crime, was among those arrested, along with a Madrid art dealer and his son.