ContemporaryArt

Solasta Studios partners with Tagsmart to become the first US-based studio to certificate every online sale

“We are excited to be the first studio in the United States to partner with Tagsmart. Providing our collectors with Tagsmarts innovative DNA tagging and artwork verification technology ensures that an investment in a Solasta Limited Edition is protected as it is passed down through the generations”.

Mick McElroy, Managing Partner of Solasta Studios

martha solasta studios tagsmart

London (4 October 2018) - Tagsmart, the global innovators of DNA tagging and artwork verification, today announces a partnership with Solasta Studios, who represent the exclusive collection of limited edition giclée prints of American artists Martha and Jon McElroy.

Tagsmart will offer their certification and verification services to Solasta Studios to certify every limited edition sold online.

Solasta Studios will be the first studio in the USA to secure all of their online sales using Tagsmart’s pioneering technology

john solasta studios tagsmart

Race is on to beat art forgery with DNA technology

A British company is the latest to launch a labelling system that uses synthetic DNA to help protect works by living artists. Mark Darbyshire, the London framer, and Steve Cooke, the software developer, have created Tagsmart Certify to help combat forgeries. While issues of authenticity dog the market for older works, Cooke says the dynamics of today’s broader landscape—including online channels and emerging markets—heighten the need for immediate authenticity in contemporary art.

“Some artists don’t want to get technical, but they may now just have to be,” he says. Artists who have already endorsed the product—which has 12 security features, including its DNA label—include Mat Collishaw, Idris Khan and Gary Hume, who are among Tagsmart’s founding supporters.

Here's why this small painting costs $20 million

This month, New York will once again host a “gigaweek” of postwar, impressionist, modern, and contemporary art auctions, where hundreds of millions of dollars’ worth of paintings and sculptures will sell every night for five days in a row.

The current narrative sending jitters through the art world is that the market, especially at the high end, is experiencing “a correction,” which is a polite way of saying that wildly expensive paintings are becoming slightly less so. Still, the evening auctions have more than enough multimillion-dollar, museum-quality artworks that will (if they sell) quiet naysayers—at least for now.