Canvas

Tagsmart weekly discovery: the art of Martin Yeoman

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Member of the New English Art Club and The Society of Portrait Sculptors, artist Martin Yeoman trained at the Royal Academy Schools from 1975 to 1979 and teaches today at The Royal Drawing School and the New School of Art

Prolific in portraiture, still life, landscape and sculpture, Yeoman is considered one of the finest draughtsmen today. Working across a broad range of mediums, the artist has developed a style that draws inspiration from Goya and Delacroix. 

As for the artist painting first and foremost should possess honesty, feeling and integrity, his work is rooted in personal impression, drawing and painting from life. 

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Among his most notable commissions to date is the portrait of singer-songwriter Ed Sheeran and of Her Majesty The Queen’s grandchildren, now housed in the Royal Collection at Windsor Castle. Yeoman has also accompanied HRH The Prince of Wales on official overseas tours to the Gulf States, Hong Kong, Nepal and India. His portrait of Sir James Whyte Black is in the National Portrait Gallery collection. 

The artist won the Ondaatje Prize for Portraiture in 2002 and the Doreen McIntosh Prize in 2016 and has been included in the Royal Academy Summer Exhibition on 19 occasions (1976–2006), the Lynn Painter-Stainers Prize 2017 and in the BP Portrait Award, 1981, 1983 and 2016.

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Selected for last year’s BP Portrait Award was Yeoman’s Laurie Weeden, D-Day Glider Pilot portrait, one of four studies the artist made following a special commission by HRH The Duke of Rothesay for the 2015 exhibition The Last of The Tide at the Buckingham Palace.

It’s here! Meet our new Smart Tag for canvas works!

Just a year after the launch of Tagsmart Certify, a new standard for authenticity in art, we proudly present our new Smart Tag for canvas works, the latest addition to our family of tags designed for the mediums you love.

The problem of fakes and forgeries continues to plague the art market. Tagsmart’s new Smart Tag is a powerful countermeasure, which will offer protection to a larger segment of the market. I am encouraged by the innovation which is setting a new standard in authentication.“ – Colette Loll, Art Fraud Insights

The Smart Tag for canvas is archival and features the latest synthetic DNA and security elements. Its pioneering design allows for a quick and easy application and renders the Smart Tag flexible and free to bend, roll and expand/shrink with the natural movements of the canvas. Following conservation best practices, the Smart Tag fragments with any attempt to transfer or remove it, making it unable for reuse.

I believe this Smart Tag for canvas works will become a fundamental rule of thumb in protecting and securing artworks. This tag will revolutionise the art market, giving artists the opportunity to safeguard their highest valued works.“ – Deborah Azzopardi

Register now to order your Smart Tags for canvas, paper or aluminium works.

Can you spot the difference?

The art of forgery has progressed step by step with the evolution of art. Some forgers even create fake paper trails. Others are so accurate that even the experts can’t tell them apart, and then science must step in to analyse the paint, canvas or relative age of the work.

At the Piramal Museum of Art in Lower Parel, an exhibition titled Likeness Without Reference – The Cultures of Forgery, is putting the real and the counterfeit side by side to try and show viewers the scale of the problem, and teach them a little bit about how to tell real master art from forgery (signatures and markings play a key role, FYI).

Spanish artist faces authorship lawsuit

The artist Antonio de Felipe, arguably Spain’s most established contemporary Pop artist, is facing one of the most challenging moments of his career: Fumiko Negishi, a Japanese artist based in Spain, has launched a lawsuit claiming she has painted 221 canvases signed by De Felipe.

Negishi said she worked at De Felipe’s Madrid studio for over 10 years, from 2006 until this past February, when she received a letter of dismissal citing financial reasons. Upon her dismissal, she felt that the artist did not respect her work or had any sympathy towards her situation, so she decided to tell her story.

She is not only telling her story to the Spanish media, but also to a judge. In the lawsuit, she demands that de Felipe “admits the truthful facts regarding the authorship of the paintings” and tells collectors and institutions that have purchased said works that Negishi is their author, or at least co-author.

She also demands that de Felipe rectify statements he made in media outlets claiming to be the sole author of his works, with no mention of Negishi’s contributions.

Meanwhile, de Felipe deny the claims: “[Negishi] has intervened in some areas of my paintings, but the intellectual authorship of the works is mine. Fumiko has not contributed anything to them,” De Felipe said, accusing Negishi of being disloyal and adding that she’s only “a studio assistant, like all artists have.”

Negishi, meanwhile, claims she executed the 221 paintings from scratch, based on sketches De Felipe had given to her. Negishi adds that those sketches were done by Photoshop, not by the artist’s hand, and that on occasions not even a sketch was provided as a starting point, only a photograph or an idea. Except for the original sketches, and adding his signature to the finished works, “De Felipe did not touch those paintings,” Negishi states.

Negishi’s current lawsuit doesn’t include a monetary compensation, but could be followed up with a subsequent legal process where it would be demanded.

Gallery of fake paintings opens in Argentina

The paintings in Buenos Aires’ newest gallery may look like the work of great artists, but they are actually rip-offs – and the exhibition’s organisers want you to know it.

One of the works doesn’t even look the part – it is supposed to be a masterpiece by the late Argentine painter Antonio Berni, but the main figure’s head is cut off by the frame. The 40 canvases on display at the exhibition in the Argentine capital were seized in a raid organised by cross-border police agency Interpol on a band of forgers.

Nazi-looted Dutch Old Master pulled from auction

Vienna’s im Kinsky auction house has removed Portrait of a Man, a painting by Dutch Old Master Bartholomeus van der Helst, from its April 12 and 13 sales. The lot was pulled at the request of the French government, which believes the painting was looted by Nazis, according to Agence France-Presse.

The painting was once part of the collection of Adolphe Schloss, a Jewish art collector who lived in Paris. The Nazis seized the collection in April 1943 after invading France, and earmarked Portrait of a Man for the planned the Führermuseum in Linz. The canvas was recovered by Allied forces following the war, but was reportedly “stolen from an Allied art collecting point” afterward, the Art Newspaper notes.